Urban Reform Project

Australia’s infrastructure shortfall must be urgently addressed in order to ensure our ongoing economic growth and to deliver equitable outcomes for stakeholders and the community.

“Australia will need to pull every lever – new funding mechanisms, new technology, new delivery mechanisms – to get anywhere near reaching its future infrastructure targets……” CEDA, 20th July 2010 

 
The Warren Centre’s Towards a City of Cities report (2004) presented a range of strategies for building sustainable cities. The project provided detailed recommendations for government and industry action, and a number of these were embraced.

However, we are still not consistently delivering the required infrastructure, and our infrastructure deficit is being compounded by an increasing population and dwindling private sector investment.

This infrastructure shortfall must be urgently addressed in order to ensure ongoing economic growth and to deliver equitable outcomes for stakeholders and the community.

The Warren Centre established the Urban Reform Project with the following broad aims:

  • To identify barriers to successful infrastructure projects
  • To identify and publish an Agenda for Reform through a consensus based approach
  • To develop and publish a Framework for Reform and an Action Plan for implementation, expanding on the Agenda for Reform.

The ideas and key concerns identified through the colloquium were collated into the Handbook for Reform, which outlines the key success factors and barriers in bringing projects to fruition, including decision making and procurement processes. It is designed to help bridge the gap between planning and delivery of infrastructure. The Handbook for Reform outlined the Agenda for Reform.

 

The Framework for Reform

Project Diagram

Following the release of the Handbook for Reform, the project is developing and testing the Framework for Reform through a series of case studies. These case studies cover:

  • Connectivity (five major transport projects)
  • Resilience (the capacity of cities including to withstand shocks)
  • Planning for Growth

These case studies assess a number of infrastructure examples against the principles identified in the Handbook for Reform – being governance, vision, strategy and implementation.

Each case study is scoped by a small group of experienced industry professionals, across a broad range of disciplines, to produce a summary. These case study summaries will each be examined though a colloquium which brings together industry, government, workforce, community, commercial and public sector experts to further the case studies and identify core strategies for delivering successful infrastructure.

 

Getting Involved

The project has been initiated by The Warren Centre and is supervised by a Steering Committee, under the chairmanship of Mr Richard Dinham, to include representatives of key supporters of the project. Currently these include representatives from planning, consulting, contracting, insurance, financing, government and academia. Project Fellows will be appointed to provide high level strategic guidance to the project. Stakeholders from all disciplines who have an interest and experience in infrastructure projects are invited to participate in the project.

Support can be provided through participation in the case studies, providing information or research assistance, or financial support to assist with production costs and events. The Warren Centre welcomes your involvement in this project. Sponsorship opportunities are available to help provide the resources to deliver better infrastructure outcomes for NSW. Please contact The Warren Centre for more information.

 

Free Online Download

Handbook For Reform – Delivery Of Successful Infrastructure In NSW

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This Handbook for Reform is the result of a year-long research project by the Warren Centre’s Urban Reform Project Group. It is designed to help bridge the gap between planning and delivery of infrastructure.

It outlines the key success factors and barriers in bringing projects to fruition, including decision making and procurement processes. This Handbook sets out an agenda which can form the basis of a reform program. It is also timely, as the Metropolitan Plan for Sydney was delivered in December 2010 to guide the long term growth of Sydney and the New South Wales state election in 2011 will provide an opportunity to consider new approaches to Infrastructure policy and decision making.

ConnectivityConnectivity Case Study

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Connectivity: Successful cities effectively connect people, jobs, goods and services.

Five infrastructure case studies emphasising Connectivity has been assessed by teams of experts in planning, engineering and finance. The case studies included:

  • Two major proposals as yet unrealised – a Greater Sydney Airport and a High Speed Rail service connecting the major eastern cities 
  • Two regional infrastructure initiatives – the Regional Rail Plan in Victoria and the South East Queensland (SEQ) Regional Plan 
  • The completed WestLink (M7) Motorway project in Sydney’s west.