Prototype Weekly
Our weekly newsletter, The Prototype, showcases the biggest developments in technology, science and innovation worldwide and their implications for Australia. Sign up here to receive it in your inbox.

The Prototype, 26 October 2018 – Pyongyang’s APT38, auditing AI, climate and health

The Prototype, 26 October 2018 – Pyongyang’s APT38, auditing AI, climate and health

The Australian Human Rights Commission is consulting with the community on the question of how technology affects vulnerable people. As digital innovation accelerates, new research on ethical machine learning and artificial intelligence is needed to inform public discourse, maximise the positive economic efficiencies from emerging technologies, and avoid unnecessary harms.

The Prototype, 19 October 2018 – Finisar PM prize, consumer genealogy, global oil rises

The Prototype, 19 October 2018 – Finisar PM prize, consumer genealogy, global oil rises

In Canberra this week, several hundred attendees celebrated the Prime Minister’s Science Prizes. STEM teachers, basic scientists and applied scientists were acknowledged. The cycle of educating the next generation, of making new technical discoveries, and of turning technology into commercial reality form a basis for life-improving knowledge generation and economy-building activities that improve society. Congratulations to this year’s winners and keep up the innovation!

The Prototype, 12 October 2018 – Soyuz aborts, Google+ aborts, climate warning

The Prototype, 12 October 2018 – Soyuz aborts, Google+ aborts, climate warning

On behalf of our Board and many Friends of the Warren Centre, we say farewell to Alex Harrington and thank her for eight years of dedicated service. In honour of Alex’s passion for sustainability, this week’s stories are told with a no-holds-barred view towards the climate challenges facing us all as professionals and as citizens. Farewell Alex, and all the best for a bright future!

The Prototype, 28 September 2018 – Gene drive, organoid oesophagus, tech under scrutiny

The Prototype, 28 September 2018 – Gene drive, organoid oesophagus, tech under scrutiny

The rapid expansion of digital technology propels massive economic activity today and has captured the public’s attention and imagination. Biotechnology is also advancing at an astonishing rate. Though much of this work is advancing with non-traditional connections to IT, data analytics, biomedical engineering and biomolecular engineering, much of this news might be outside the awareness of traditional technologists and engineers. The first two articles this week showcase the speed and power of DNA editing development and the expansion of stem cell technology. We hope you enjoy these ten best stories from this week’s science, technology and innovation headlines

The Prototype, 21 September 2018 – Digital opportunity, Australia’s smart cities, Carbon Revolution

The Prototype, 21 September 2018 – Digital opportunity, Australia’s smart cities, Carbon Revolution

Our workforce must diversify if we are to have a chance of successfully navigating all this change and adapting to disruption. Whether we are there yet, particularly in Australia, is clear from The Warren Centre’s recent research and it does not paint a good picture. We have yet to fully embrace 50% of the population by engaging more women particularly in STEM areas. One solution is for women to make their own business rules. If you are, or someone you know is, interested “starting your startup” come along to our next Entrepreneurship 101 course.

The Prototype, 14 September 2018 – Automation vulnerability, ocean cleanup, innovation reboot

The Prototype, 14 September 2018 – Automation vulnerability, ocean cleanup, innovation reboot

Last weekend around 100 young lawyers, IT professionals, engineers and students held a hackathon at the NSW Law Society. One of the challenge problems posed to the teams was the difficulty of the justice system to cope with the state’s highly diverse multiculturalism. Too frequently, people coming before courts need translation services to communicate effectively. Teams offered creative high-tech solutions, including on-demand digital translation.