Vision30: The Next 30 Years of Innovation

About Vision 30

To celebrate 30 years of innovation, The Warren Centre led a discussion to create a vision and strategy for Australian industries for the next 30 years. The event took place in Sydney on Friday 8 November 2013.

What will be the industries of the future and how do we provide the core skills to lead them? We know that less than 20% of current dominant firms will still exist in 30 years – but what will replace them? Vision30 brought together high level and emerging leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs to identify where Australia’s industry should be in 30 years and how we will get there.

The day was in three parts, looking at What Might Be, What Can Be, and What Should Be the technologies and industries of the future.

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From technology innovation to industry leadership: a new vision for Australia

What Might Be, What Can Be, and What Should Be 

Part 1: What Might Be: through the eyes of the under-30 generation. Speakers under 30 years of age, selected from an Australia-wide competition sponsored by Standards Australia, will provide their view of the game changers of the next 30 years.

Part 2: What Can Be: involving emerging and high-level achievers who have experienced the challenges of building industries around technology innovation. It will comprise four one-hour sessions.

Part 3: What Should Be: from the collective wisdom of the day, by way of an interactive forum involving all participants and attendees.

The Warren Centre’s strength is in identifying solutions to issues in the increasingly complex economic, technological and social environment around us. By drawing from a diversity of experience and expertise, the event gave us the opportunity to produce an important body of work to focus our future endeavours.

Speakers

Presented by Australia’s industry leaders and thinkers, including:

  • Keynote speaker: Ian Thomas, President, Boeing Australia & South Pacific
  • Matt Barrie – CEO, Freelancer.com
  • Catherine Caruana-McManus – Smarter Cities Executive, IBM
  • Branko Celler – Principal Scientist R&D Strategy, CSIRO Computational Informatics
  • Professor Martin Cole – Chief of CSIRO Animal, Food and Health Sciences
  • Chris Delaney – CEO, Goodman Fielder
  • Professor Andy Dong – Future Fellow & Warren Centre Chair for Engineering Innovation
  • Hugh Durrant-Whyte – CEO, NICTA
  • Bronwyn Evans – CEO, Standards Australia
  • Alan Finkel – President, ATSE and Chancellor, Monash University
  • Bruce Grey – CEO, Advanced Manufacturing CRC
  • Peter Leonard – Partner, Gilbert + Tobin
  • James Bradfield Moody – CEO, TuShare
  • Barry Murphy – Past President, Caltex Australia
  • Greg Stone – CTO, Microsoft Australia
  • John Webster – CEO, Foodbank

Competition 

Seven inspired visions of the future of technology and industry

 

Seven finalists under 30 presented their visions for the technologies and industries that will build Australia – and the winner took home a $5,000 prize.As part of our Vision30 anniversary event, The Warren Centre and Standards Australia held a national competition for those under the age of 30. Seven finalists presented their five-minute visions at our Vision30 event on Friday 8th November.

The winning presentation, taking away a $5,000 prize, was by Nicky Ringland with Kickstarting The Education Revolution.

The other finalists were:

  • Ali Fathi (NSW)
  • Luke Webb (ACT)
  • Rowan Braham (NSW)
  • Christopher Nheu (NSW)
  • Jake Horder (NSW)
  • James Robert Keane, Natalie Radojcic, Reuben Kent (TAS)

 

The aim of the competition was to find the person or team who could best identify and articulate the most likely game-changing technologies of the next 30 years, and how world-class industries can be developed from them in Australia. The challenge faced by the contestants was to articulate and stimulate an audience with their views in no more than five minutes, in line with the entry guidelines and the terms of reference for Vision30. The emphasis of the competition was on quality of the ideas and contestants’ ability to express them concisely and lucidly using appropriate visual media.

Outcomes

Innovation is the domain of profound social change. In pursuit of that innovation: Experiences trump Products – make user experience(s) central to the products and services that deliver innovation and change.

Personalisation is a major factor for all future markets. From the Food Industry to the Health sector, the social equity associated with Personalisation is hugely important. The tradition focus on ‘The Brand’ – the big companies we relied on – has shifted: it’s about My Brand now: ‘Brand Me’

Timeframes matter. What is appropriate now is not something made 10 years or even 10 minutes ago. If the idea/solution/product is not delivered on time, as the market demands it, in a personalised way, its not a solution.

The next World War will be fought over food. Obviously vital to our existence, food and access to it is becoming more tenuous as we head into the future. If the world goes to war again it will be over food. There are many issues associated with global agriculture – energy, transportation being main ones – and technology and engineered solutions will play the most significant role in finding the solutions.

The Team Australia Approach. The 21st Century is an exciting and potentially rich time for Australia and it is there for the taking. The ‘Asian Century’ is only part of it. Focusing and supporting our innovation ecosystem delivers Australia a huge opportunity: taking advantage of a mammoth developing market, right on it’s doorstep. We cannot supply all of Asia, but we can deliver very high quality product with guaranteed provenance.

KPIs for innovation. Big Data, Metrics and Analytics are more important than ever. The traditional metrics used globally and locally to measure and incentivize progress and innovation are often wrong, inappropriate or irrelevant. Extending the old mantra that you “cannot manage what you don’t measure” to consider that if we measure the wrong things or in the wrong way then we cannot drive effective innovation and progress. This is a challenge that needs our collective focus. We must use the new tools of big data and analytics to drive widespread use of newer metrics that measure what is really important to life, Australia, me. We have the capability to innovate further and deeper. The challenge is to harness these drivers of tomorrow’s development.

We are now entering the era of the Trusted Guide. Information is everywhere, but how do you discriminate good from bad? The market is demanding quality and trusted Guides that link us with Quality Experiences. This is visible now from food security and food quality through to news, publishing and information flow generally.

Act Now! Get it out the door – don’t ‘gold plate’ things. Fear of Failure and Innovation holds us all back, holds the nation back. Those in Industry today need to help foster the capability and acceptance of failure within their teams – to fail quickly, learn from it, move on and succeed next time. Encourage innovation and commercialization, demand it now.

Education is key. Integrative education linking technical and social sciences, medicine, technology, engineering, business and economics drives progress in a social equitable framework. Australia’s future depends on it.

Not so long ago ICT was perceived as a discipline of its own. Today ICT is like oxygen, it is part of everything. Society moves quickly, yesterday’s wondrous innovations are merely part of today’s scaffolding, and our expectations for tomorrow grow commensurately.

Technologists and engineers will play a major role in shaping Australia’s tomorrow. It is incumbent on all of us to contribute to those developments, to build on these key themes, to educate our communities about the many opportunities, and most importantly to act, to act now, and realize those opportunities.

The world faces many challenges, challenges we can meet through innovation and execution.

Vision30

From technology innovation to industry leadership: a new vision for Australia

To celebrate 30 years of innovation, The Warren Centre led a discussion to create a vision and strategy for Australian industries for the next 30 years.

The event took place in Sydney on Friday 8 November. We livetweeted at twitter.com/TheWarrenCentre and #TWCVision30 – continue the conversation!

Speakers’ presentations are now available as slides to download and audio podcasts, as are the outcome messages of Vision30. You can also view photographs on our Facebook page facebook.com/TheWarrenCentre.

The discussion continues at our series of Vision30 Follow-On Seminars, starting with Professor Mark Dodgson speaking about Australia on the Global Innovation Stage on Thursday 28 November.

What might be • What can be • What should be

Presented by Australia’s industry leaders and thinkers, including:

  • Keynote speaker: Ian Thomas, President, Boeing Australia & South Pacific
  • Matt Barrie – CEO, Freelancer.com
  • Catherine Caruana-McManus – Smarter Cities Executive, IBM
  • Branko Celler – Principal Scientist R&D Strategy, CSIRO Computational Informatics
  • Professor Martin Cole – Chief of CSIRO Animal, Food and Health Sciences
  • Chris Delaney – CEO, Goodman Fielder
  • Professor Andy Dong – Future Fellow & Warren Centre Chair for Engineering Innovation
  • Hugh Durrant-Whyte – CEO, NICTA
  • Bronwyn Evans – CEO, Standards Australia
  • Alan Finkel – President, ATSE and Chancellor, Monash University
  • Bruce Grey – CEO, Advanced Manufacturing CRC
  • Peter Leonard – Partner, Gilbert + Tobin
  • James Bradfield Moody – CEO, TuShare
  • Barry Murphy – Past President, Caltex Australia
  • Greg Stone – CTO, Microsoft Australia
  • John Webster – CEO, Foodbank

Click here to download the Vision30 flyer (PDF, 807 kB).

Conversation began Friday 8 November, 2013
Continue the conversation:
#TWCVision30

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