About This Project

Fire Safety Engineering

 

The risks associated with failed fire safety have been made clear by the Grenfell fire tragedy in London which caused the deaths of seventy-one residents and injured a further seventy. The Grenfell tragedy was believed to be exacerbated by combustible external cladding that enabled the fire to ascend rapidly unimpeded, despite the efforts of fire crews. This event triggered a public inquiry in the UK and multiple parallel reviews around the world, including Australia. While many inquiries are focused on products and appropriate cladding, The Warren Centre recognises that there is a much bigger issue to be considered that speaks to the core of fire safety engineering.

 

To date, The Warren Centre has released three reports as part of this series:

  • The Education report discusses the current status of education and training of fire safety engineers; as well as the competencies which are expected of a fire safety engineering professional.
  • The Regulation, Control and Accreditation Report
  • The Methods Report takes a closer look at international guidelines and methods currently used and consider where fundamental change is needed for Australia.

Download The Interim Report:

The Role of Fire Safety Engineering

Download Report Three:

The Methods Report

We need your help to continue this project

Would your business or organisation be interested in sponsoring future reports? In-depth research reports such as this Fire Safety Engineering project require resources and donations from supporters like you. Organisations keen to contribute funds to ensure we really transform our discipline of fire safety engineering, to lift to a proper professional level, create a better business environment, and deliver better outcomes to the community should contact The Warren Centre today.

Download Reports One and Two:

The Education Report & Regulation, Control and Accreditation Report

An Enquiry into this issue

The delivery of major infrastructure and buildings requires detailed planning, design and construction. Robust but efficient approval procedures are vital to ensure safety. The process necessitates that all parties involved in the development understand and are appropriately qualified to deliver. This is particularly true for fire safety engineering.

Urgent action is required to find fire safety solutions owned and led by the built environment

The risks associated with failed fire safety have been made clear by the Grenfell fire tragedy in London which caused the deaths of seventy-one residents and injured a further seventy.

The Grenfell tragedy was believed to be exacerbated by combustible external cladding that enabled the fire to ascend rapidly unimpeded, despite the efforts of fire crews. This event triggered a public inquiry in the UK and multiple parallel reviews around the world, including Australia.

While many inquiries are focused on products and appropriate cladding, The Warren Centre recognises that there is a much bigger issue to be considered that speaks to the core of fire safety engineering:

How do we avoid risk and uncertainty around fire safety issues in building construction?

The project will focus on this core element while exploring the contributing factors such as:

  • Are building owners and construction companies able to access the right skills and resources for fire safety design and installation?
  • How do we best avoid fire safety risks like the cladding issue while maintaining all the advantages of performance based fire safety design?
  • Do we have the right compliance frameworks in place?
  • Is there an optimal model of delivery of fire safety engineering that is practical for all jurisdictions and authorities?
  • And what competencies, education and accreditation are required of our fire safety engineers for a better future?
READ THE FIRE SAFETY ENGINEERING - ENQUIRY INTO THE ISSUE
Publisher and Editor

The Warren Centre

Authors

Peter Johnson, Stephen Kip

Design by

CreativeHQ

Date
Category
Project, Publication, Report
Tags
Fire Safety Engineering

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