USyd’s inter-disciplinary invention program is Inventing the Future

If you are a postgraduate or HDR student from the University of Sydney’s Faculties of Business, Architecture, Design and Planning, Science or Engineering with a desire to invent solutions for the future, the University of Sydney’s new program is for you.

Inventing the Future is an inter-disciplinary invention program run on six intensive Fridays across semester 2 covering the complete process of innovation, from ideation to prototyping (budget provided) to a funding pitch to industry, enabled by interdisciplinary collaboration and cross-faculty teaching.

You will work in inter-disciplinary teams on real world briefs supported up by research
academics and industry partners. This semester’s focus will be:

  1. Precision Animal Health: use of technology such as sensors, robotics and
    analytics to improve the health and welfare of livestock. This project could also apply
    to wildlife/conservation.
  2. Sustainable Packaging: addressing the critical issue of waste by reducing the
    environmental impact of packaging. This could include approaches to make it more
    recyclable, reducing packaging or making it from less damaging materials.
  3. Robotics for Rescue: Robotics allow us to provide services remotely, and in
    dangerous environments. The project will consider how robotics can assist in rescue
    situations including natural disasters, such as fire and flooding, and using technology
    such as real time machine vision systems.

Places are strictly limited. This is a competitive entry unit. Please complete the application form and email to Maryanne Large (maryanne.large@sydney.edu.au) by 5 July, 2017.

Download more details (PDF, 4.3 MB)

Download application form (Word, 60 kB)

Image: 2016 winning team (L-R) Xanthe Croot (School of Physics), Christopher Chan (Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning), Anastasia Volkova (School of Aeronautical, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering), Brandon Cabanilla, (University of Sydney Business School) and Malcolm Ramsay (School of Computation Chemistry).